Museum Open by Appointment

The Scarborough Historical Society Museum is open to a limited number of visitors by appointment only. Visitors may schedule appointments for Tuesdays and the second Saturday of the month from 9:00 AM to Noon. Appointments are 50 minutes. 

9:10 to 10:00
10:05 to 10:55
11::00 to 11:50

Please indicate if your visit is for to see the Museum displays or for Research time. 

Volunteers will wear masks while visitors are in the building. Visitors must wear masks while visiting to protect other visitors and volunteers.

Also, we will be collecting data from visitors to assist with contact tracing should staff or visitors test positive for COVID-19.

If anyone (visitors or volunteers) tests positive for the disease, the museum will close until the situation is resolved. The Society Board of Directors will continue to monitor government and public health authorities’ updates for guidance on public safety measures and will adapt measures accordingly. .

Please email scarboroughhist@gmail.com to schedule an appointment. Alternately, you may schedule a visit by phone (207-885-9997) at least 1 week in advance. 


Please see Maine’s Museum COVID19 Prevention Checklist Industry Guidance for further information on Museum COVID protocols. Also, see Google’s Covid-19 Alert for Maine for the latest status of Coronavirus disease in Maine.


 

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Updated Scarborough Annual Reports

Under the Scarborough Annual Reports, I added the 1956 Annual Report.

In 1956, the Town of Scarborough began separating the “Warrant for the Town Meeting” from being a part of the Annual Report to being a separate publication.
The “Warrant for the Town Meeting of the Town of Scarborough, Monday, March 5, 1956.” is now available at Digital Maine and Archive.Org.

I have also added the 1957 and 1958 Scarborough Town Reports.

1957  Report
(February 1, 1958)
Digital Maine
Archive.Org

1958 Report
(January 31, 1959)
Digital Maine
Internet Archives


 

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SEDCO produced videos of how COVID affected several Scarborough businesses

SEDCO – Scarborough Economic Development Corporation produced an excellent series of videos regarding how Covid affected five Scarborough businesses. Represented are:

For more information on this project and “The Road to Recovery 2020 & Beyond,” please see the SEDCOMAINE.COM website.

 
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Museum Open by Appointment Only

The Scarborough Historical Society Museum is open to a limited number of visitors by appointment only. Visitors may schedule appointments for Tuesdays and the second Saturday of the month from 9:00 AM to Noon. Appointments are 50 minutes. 

9:10 to 10:00
10:05 to 10:55
11::00 to 11:50

Please indicate if your visit is for to see the Museum displays or for Research time. 

Volunteers will wear masks while visitors are in the building. Visitors must wear masks while visiting to protect other visitors and volunteers.

Also, we will be collecting data from visitors to assist with contact tracing should staff or visitors test positive for COVID-19.

If anyone (visitors or volunteers) tests positive for the disease, the museum will close until the situation is resolved. The Society Board of Directors will continue to monitor government and public health authorities’ updates for guidance on public safety measures and will adapt measures accordingly.

Please email scarboroughhist@gmail.com to schedule an appointment. Alternately, you may schedule a visit by phone (207-885-9997) at least 1 week in advance. 


Please see Maine’s Museum COVID19 Prevention Checklist Industry Guidance for further information on Museum COVID protocols. Also, see Google’s Covid-19 Alert for Maine for the latest status of Coronavirus disease in Maine.


 

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Letter from Dorothy Evens to Helen Lamb postmarked Aug 31, 1939.

[This is a letter from “Dotty” (at the Atlantic House and Cottages, Scarborough Beach, Maine,) to “Grammy” (Miss Helen Lamb, Gorham Maine R.F.D. #2. The letter was postmarked Aug 31, 1939, Scarborough, Maine at 3 PM.]

Transcription

Hi! “Grammy”,
How’s everything in Whiterock?  I’ll bet they don’t even miss me!  Are you getting so much practice in croquet that you’ll beat me all to pieces when I get back?
Gee it’s swell down here– everyone is so grand to me.  There are very few restrictions here — we can play tennis on the courts, use the shuffle board, go swimming on the same beach with the guests can an’ everything.  We stay in a house by ourselves and go to bed when we want to, only we have to get up at 5:30.  Imagine that!
Some of the youngsters I have are very exasperating but some of them are dolls.  I have quite a lot of time off, but I don’t know where it goes to. Honestly it seems as though I had been here ten minutes.
I think I will have mama Sunday night and i want them to bring you with ’em.  I’ll tell Helen to call you.
I’m getting along famously with my work.  I still write the orders just to be sure I get everything.  The nurses are awful good (every child has a nurse or governess) and I  have a lot of fun with them.
Two of the girls weren’t speaking to me because I glanced at their boy friends.  You should see them — dumb as they make them. A new waitress is just about it so they used to come into my dining room after every meal while I was sweeping. When I found out about the girl friends I stopped that.  Now the girls smile.  I think they are terribly silly — boy if I did that every time a girl looked at Phil I couldn’t keep them straight and I might speak to the wrong person.  There are about  three radios going here all different so I’ll stop before it gets so  you can’t make sense out of this thing. Write. Love, Dotty

The address is just what is at the top of the papers.
Have about six more letters to write.  Got a letter from Phil this morning. His letters are swell, just as though he were here talking to me. I don’t see how he makes them so interesting.

[Transcription by Rebecca (Plummer) Delaware – 4/11/2021]

Additional Notes:

  • “Grammy” is Helen Lamb, later Plummer.
  • “Dotty” is believed to be Dorothy Evens. Apparently a waitress for the Atlantic House in Scarborough in 1939.
  • “Helen” mentioned in the letter is probably Dotty’s sister, Helen Evans.
  • “Phil” mentioned is probably Philip Bodge.
  • Helen Lamb, Dorothy Evans, and Philip Bodge graduated from Gorham High School as part of the class of 1940. The Evans and Lambs were from Whiterock (a part of Gorham) which is mostly a rural farming community. Philip Bodge lived in Gorham village.
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Letter dated 28 Feb 1870 re “Strip” between Scarboro & Gorham

Portland Feb. 28 1870          

Dear Jim,

Letter re. Strip Between Scarboro and Gorham – 28 Feb 1870 – Page 1

            With regard to the claim of the “strip” I am aware that there was some provision in the act setting off a part of the Town of Scarboro to Gorham that provided for returning to the “strip” a part of the same that might be reimbursed to Scarboro by the State. But what part?

            If in proposition to the valuation that was transfered by the same act from Scarboro to Gorham there would be nothing to pay, as no valuation was transferred to Gorham. Scarboro paid State & Property(?) Tax for the town of Gorham on the value of the strip 3 successive years. Finally when is was arranged by the Legislature the valuation was fixed by a meeting of the selectmen of Gorham & Scarboro and I think they made it about $36,000 and this was all the selectmen of Gorham would agree to.

            Again the war had not ended when the “strip” was set off and it was only the amount

[New Page ]

Letter re. Strip Between Scarboro and Gorham – 28 Feb 1870 – Page 2

reimbursed to the town on the men enlisted previous to, or up to the time that they were set off in which the strip could have any claim.

            And again Scarboro was one of the sub districts of this District and was just the same after the strip was set off to Gorham as before. An effort was made to have the men liable to draft transfered from Scarboro to Gorham but it could not be accomplished and our quota was made larger because the “strip” was enrolled with us and we furnished the quota for the strip and paid the expense after it was set off to Gorham but of course could not tax them for this expense.

            I am surprised that under these circumstances they have made any claim at all; and still more that any action should be taken on it by the Legislature without notice to the Town of Scarboro.

            There ought to be power somewhere to do justice in this case if anywhere in the Legislature. They without doubt mean justice but how can they do justice unless they hear both sides. Scarboro has not been notified in any way I am informed.

In haste,          
Horatio Hight


[Transcription by Maggie Vickerson, Scarborough Historical Society, 8 May 2020]
[Encapsulated Collection 23 – Letter re Strip Between Scarboro and Gorham – 28 Feb 1870]

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New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham [1865]

[Page 1]

New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham – 1865 (Page 1)

Agreeable to notice given by the Selectmen of the town of Scarborough to the Selectmen of the town of Gorham to meet at the House of John M. Parker in said Gorham on the 19th day of June 1865 at 9 o’clock in the forenoon for the purpose of establishing a new line between the said towns of Scarboro and Gorham in accordance with an act of the Legislature Approved March 4th 1864 setting off a part of the lower of Scarborough and annexing the same to the town of Gorham. We the undersigned Selectmen of the Towns of Scarborough and Gorham met at the time and place and for the purpose aforesaid and proceeded to name(?) and establish a new line between said towns as follows

[Page 2]

New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham – 1865 (Page 2)

Commencing at a stone on the side line of Buxton, north corner of Scarboro’ and southwest corner of Gorham – thence running S. 42 ½ ° East 178 Rods to a stone on the Buxton County road. Thence on same course 240 Rods to a stone on the Burnham Road thence on same course 209 Rods to a stone on Ai Waterhouse meadow. Thence S. 49° West to a stone 21 Rods 10 links, thence S. 44 ½° East 29 Rods 17 links to a stone in the east corner of Jonathan(?) Fogg’s meadow, and south corner of Ai Waterhouse’s meadow. Thence N. 50° East 20 Rods to a stone sitting in the South side of said meadow N. 53° East 186 Rods to the Mitchell Road to a stone. Thence north 48 ¾° East 972 Rods to a stone at the corner of Scarborough, Westbrook, and Gorham

Scarborough July 3d 1865

Richard Leavitt } Selectmen of
   Geo M. Carter } Scarborough

   James Phinney } Selectmen of
Edward Files } Gorham

[-back-]

New Town line
between Scarboro
and Gorham


[Transcription by Maggie Vickerson, Scarborough Historical Society, 8 May 2020]
[Ref: Encapsulated Collection 22 – New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham – 1865]

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Town Line – Scarboro & Gorham – Nov 1831

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General Lafayette’s Visit to Scarborough

by Linda Snow McLoon

The Marquis de Lafayette
Joseph-Désiré Court, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

The Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) was a French aristocrat and military officer who came to the aid of the American colonies during the Revolutionary War. He developed a friendship with George Washington, who put him in command of American troops in several battles, including the Siege of Yorktown. His participation in the war symbolized our link to France, without whose support we might not have won our independence from Great Britain.

As the last surviving Major General of the Revolutionary War, Lafayette was invited by President James Monroe and Congress to visit the 24-state country in 1824 for what would become his Farewell Tour in the United States. As he traveled through the various states, he was greeted along the roadways and in towns and cities by large crowds of cheering citizens.

Scarborough was among the towns that graciously greeted Lafayette in 1825. On his first day in Maine, the general dined in Kennebunk before spending the night in Saco. On the morning of June 25, he was escorted by a large cavalcade to the village of Scarborough and received with high feelings of gratitude by the townspeople.[1]  

A newspaper article that appeared in 1900, 75 years later, describes Lafayette’s visit:
The citizens had an outrider to herald the approach of the illustrious Frenchman, and it was just a quarter before 8 when he appeared on the crown of the hill just beyond the village, swinging his hat and shouting, “The Gin’ral’s comin’!” Five minutes later the gorgeous coach that was presented Lafayette by the citizens of Philadelphia hove in sight drawn by four white prancing steeds, all resplendent in the dancing sunbeams of the early summer morning. When it rapidly bowled down the gentle declivity in full view of all the expectant townsmen a shout went up that Dunstan probably never heard before and from present indications will never hear again. The Dunstan people had erected a ‘noble arch’ (Dunstan was great on arches in those days, having erected one for Monroe seven years before and one for Jackson when he was expected), and the main street was thronged with spectators from miles around.

The General was entirely taken by surprise at the spontaneous demonstration and ordered a halt to hold a brief reception on the lawn in front of the residence of Dr. Alvin Bacon, where Judge Southgate, Dr. Bacon, Parson Tilton and other dignitaries of the town were presented to him. The General also called for a basin of water and a towel to bathe his face, as the morning was hot and the road somewhat dusty, and these together with a cake of soap were brought by a little daughter of Dr. Bacon’s, who always treasured the cake of soap while she lived, and it is still kept as an heirloom by the family.

The start was soon made and the General passed under the arch, upon which was inscribed, “Thrice Welcome to Lafayette.” The cheering was again renewed with added vigor, and Lafayette doffed his chapeau again and again. The visitors at Dunstan, many of whom were out for the day, filed in after the General’s coach and followed it to Portland, while many of the young men preceded the coach on horseback, all forming a procession nearly a half-mile in length that reached Portland shortly after nine o’clock.

Dr. Bacon’s house

Lafayette is reputed to have addressed the large group outside Dr. Bacon’s house under an impressive elm tree. While the tree is no longer standing, a piece of that tree – known as the Lafayette elm – is in the collections of the Scarborough Historical Society.

Dr. Bacon came from Charlestown, MA and settled in Scarborough around 1800, taking over the extensive practice of Dr. Southgate.[3] He was a favorite of all who knew him. When he rode out, he knew the names and personal history of the occupants of every house he passed.

He was present at almost every birth and tried to attend every burial. He sat many times with the minister beside a death bed. The doctor’s health eventually began to break down and he was obliged to gradually give up his practice. After a great deal of suffering in his last days, Dr. Bacon died in 1848 at the age of seventy-seven.[4]

[NOTE: This article is also available in PDF Format HERE.]


Endnotes

[1] John Francis Sprague, Sprague’s Journal of Maine History, p. 206

[2] Scarborough Historical Society, laminated scrapbook, 1884-1979, p. 68

[3] William S. Southgate, The History of Scarborough from 1633–1783, reprint, p. 207

[4] Dorothy Shaw Libbey, Scarborough Becomes a Town, p. 26

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A New Road – Saco Line to Pains Road – 1822

Persuant to a request of a number of inhabitance freeholders of the town of Scarborough to lay out a road from the town line betw said Scarb & Saco to go into Pains road at or near Enoch Libbys road so cald.  We the subscribers select men of said town have lain out the road as follows [?] Began at the town line between Scarb & Saco about forty rods south east of Nonesuch Millpond on land belonging to the heirs of Richard Burnham Deceased, and run N 65 E 120 rods to land of Samuel Rice Theme on the same coars 4 rods to Nonesuch road.  Thence on the same cours 24 rods across land of Ephraim Holmes to land of Joseph S. Jewett.  Thence 14 rods across one corner of said Jewetts land to an old town road.  Thence N 69 E 55 rods to one other piece of land belonging to said Ephraim Holmes partly on land of said Jewett, John Andrews & Robert McLaughlin & part by an old town road.  Thence N 63 E 111 rods across said Eph Holmes land to land of Daniel Holmes.  Thence N 58 E 96 rods to land formaly owned by Samuel Richards one half of the two last mentioned measurements is on old town road.  Thence on the same coars 410 rods to the great sand gully so cald to land formaly owned by Jonathan Richards.  Thence N 65 E 91 rods to Broadturn Road.  Thence on the same coars 76 rods to the head of the gulley in the plain between Broadturn road & the Western beach [?] of road.  Thence N 73 E 222 rods to the edg of Canada Swamp.  Thence N 412 E 26 rods to B&D Harmons land.  Thence 70 rods to Daniel Harmons land.  Thence 60 rods to Robt McLaughlins land.  Thence 36 rods to the eastern ridg road.  Thence on the same coars 1416 ½ rods across land of Daniel Harmon to land of Jacob Mills.  Thence 150 rods to land of Benj & Daniel Harmon.  Thence 124 rods to Enoch Libbys road where it enters the swamp.  Thence about S 73 E 214 rods to Pains road.  Said road is to be four rods wide in every part, the line to be the middle of the road, said road is staked out & trees marked the whole distance.

Laid out Decem 12th 1822                              Gideon Rich                }           Select
                                                                           Joseph Fogg                 }         men

                                                                        John Andrews                }           Surveyor


[Back of Page]

A return of a road from the town line to Pains road

[Transcription by Carole Plowman, Scarborough Historical Society, 19 February  2021]
[Ref: “Encapsulated Collection 52 – A return of a road from the town line to Paine Road – 12 Dec 1822.jpg”]

 

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