Roast Beef Supper

Saturday, March 3, 2018 – 4:00—5:40 pm

Sponsored by the Scarborough Lions

For the Benefit of the Scarborough Historical Society
& Venturing Crew 39

Tickets: $10.00 for Adults, $5.00 for Children
(Available at the Scarborough Historical Museum Tuesday mornings)

Location:  Scarborough Lions Club near Sam’s on Rt. 114 in Scarborough.

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Spirits Alive Program – February 24, 2018

The Strangling Angel in Casco Bay: Epidemic Diphtheria in Coastal Maine, 1735-1750

In 1735, a new disease seized the northeast of North America. The mysterious throat distempers never achieved the notoriety of other diseases of the colonial era, but no single epidemic of the period proved more deadly to European settlers. It is estimated that by 1740, deaths in New England exceeded 5,000 out of a population of roughly 200,000 and that over 90% were children. While the presence of the distempers in Coastal Maine has been acknowledged, deaths in Casco Bay have never been included due to a lack of reliable data. Combining traditional research with computational humanities techniques, Nicholas E. Bonneau brings our region into this narrative

Saturday, February 24, 1:30 PM at the Wishcamper Center, Bedford St. on the USM Portland Campus, with parking in the USM Bedford St. garage. The lecture is free, though donations are gratefully accepted.

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Portland Railroad: Trolleys Through Scarborough, Maine

4 March 2018, 1 PM

Scarborough Public Library

Image of the Portland Railroad's Letter "S" Trestle on the road to Old Orchard Beach circa 1903

Portland Railroad’s Letter “S” Trestle on the road to Old Orchard Beach circa 1903

The Portland Railroad system as it existed following the completion of the Saco-Old Orchard line in 1903, operated trolleys on 93.75 miles of track, serving the communities of Portland, South Portland, Cape Elizabeth, Scarborough, Saco, Old Orchard Beach, Westbrook, Gorham, South Windham, Falmouth, Cumberland, and Yarmouth. More than 500 persons, including 133 motormen and 133 conductors, were employed. The line owned a total of 217 passenger cars (trolleys). Imagine living in Scarborough in the very early 1900s and being able to board a trolley and easily travel to visit any number of attractions in Maine, south, and east of Waterville, or south into New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and beyond. Make plans to bring a friend and attend the presentation on Sunday, March 4, 2018, at the Scarborough Public Library. Scarborough Historical Society’s guest speaker, Phil Morse from Seashore Trolley Museum will be the presenter. Artifacts from the Portland-Lewiston Interurban and its 1912 high-speed interurban, No. 14, Narcissus will be on display. The Narcissus is currently under restoration at Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport.

Location: Scarborough Public Library, 48 Gorham Rd, Scarborough, ME 04074 – March 4, 2018 at 1:00 pm.

Speaker: Philip W. Morse, Project Manager of Narcissus RenovationSeashore Trolley Museum.

For more information on the Narcissus Project, see www.narcissus1912.blogspot.com.

 

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Next Meeting February 4th

Our next meeting is February 4th!

The regular meeting of the Scarborough Historical Society has moved from the evening of the first Wednesday to the afternoon of the first Sunday and from the museum to the library.

Reminder: The next meeting will be at 2:00 pm, February 4th, 2018, at the Scarborough Public Library. “Scarborough Cemeteries” will be presented by Jan Makowski.

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Spirits Alive Program – January 27, 2018

The following program hosted by Spirits Alive may be of interest.

Your Father Still Fears at New England Will Be Depopulated:

Mainers and the Rush for California Gold

Image of man panning for goldNews of California gold changed the lives of everyone in Maine – those who left and those who stayed. Historian Jan Eakins draws on diaries and letters of 300 Mainers to tell why more than 2,000 headed west in 1849 and why thousands more followed. She explores how families coped, who returned to Maine, who stayed in the West, and the effects of migration and gold on the State of Maine.

Saturday, January 27, 2018, at 1:30 PM at the Wishcamper Center, Bedford St. on the USM Portland Campus, with parking in the USM Bedford St. garage. The lecture is free, though donations are gratefully accepted.

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Scarborough Cemeteries

The Next SHS Meeting
February 4th, 2018 – 2 PM – Scarborough Public Library

Image provided by the speaker.

The program for February will be a talk by Jan Makowski about her years of research on local cemeteries. Beginning in the late 1980s and continuing through the 1990s, Jan located over 60 private cemeteries throughout Scarborough and another 17 cemeteries in neighboring towns that have Scarborough connections. Each cemetery has been documented, photographed and indexed. Information on these cemeteries is available for research at the historical society. This program should be of great interest to those doing research of family known to have lived in the Scarborough area.

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Hotels of Scarborough

NOTE: Changes of Date, Time, and Location!

Photo of the Jocelyn Hotel

The Jocelyn Hotel

This month’s Scarborough Historical Society meeting and presentation will be at 2:00 pm, January 7th, 2018, at the Scarborough Public Library. “The Hotels of Scarborough Beach and Prouts Neck” will be presented by Rodney Laughton.

Rodney is a lifelong Scarborough resident who has been researching and documenting Scarborough history for the past 40 years. He is the author of two books concerning Scarborough and is the current president of Scarborough Historical Society.

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Meeting Location & Day to Change

For a trial period, January through May 2018, the Scarborough Historical Society monthly meetings will be held on the first Sunday of the month at 2:00 PM at the Scarborough Public Library on Gorham Road, except for April when the meeting will be on the 8th. (April 1st is Easter Sunday.) With the addition of our wonderful display cases, the meeting area at the historical society is crowded and there is limited space for program presenters. The library offers a larger meeting room and more parking spaces.

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The Wayland & The Saint Louis Home for Boys

Dunstan, Scarborough Town, Cumberland County

By Don Taylor

All of us who drive through the Dunstan area in Scarborough have seen it. The big, yellow, monster of a building at the corner of US Route One and Broadturn Road. Looking at it today it is difficult to determine what it originally was. Certainly, the Old Dunstan School building next door looks like it once was a school and the Old Southgate House a block further down the road looks like it was a large elegant house, but the big yellow building is really difficult to determine just from looking.

Image of The Wayland before it burned in 1911.

The Wayland – Before it burned in 1911

Back in 1888, Annie H Moulton purchased 30 acres of the property from John W. Leavitt. On that property Annie ran a restaurant named The Wayland. It was a “Scarborough Shore Dinner House.”  In 1902 an adjoining lot of 27 ½ acres was purchased from Daniel Snow, making the two lots together 57 ½ acres. That original Wayland building burned to the ground in 1911.

A new Wayland was built in 1912 and began operations once again. With the new Wayland a small building was added in front which served as a waiting room for the trolley that ran along Route 1.[ii]

The Wayland - Between 1912 & 1920

The Wayland – Between 1912 & 1920

In 1920, Annie H Moulton & and her husband, Alvin F. Moulton, sold those two lots and all the buildings on them to John Flaherty of Portland, who in turn sold the property to the “Roman Catholic Bishop of Portland, Inc.” (Louis S. Walsh was Bishop at the time.) The Church converted the property and on June 21, 1921, the building opened as the St. Louis Home and School for Boys. The Maine State Legislature provided $1,000 in maintenance costs to support the school in 1921, and more in later years.

The 1930 Census provides great insight into the facility. In 1930, the Saint Louis Home for Boys was run by Sister Genevieve Hayes. She was supported by two sisters, Sister Agenita Gaudette and Sister Calbanus Ridge. Although owned by the “Bishop of Portland” the facility was administered by the Sisters of Mercy. There were 55 boys living at the home during the 1930 Census[iii].  They were:

Image of the St. Louis Home and School for Boys

St. Louis Home and School for Boys – Note the addition on the right side of the building.

  • Clyde Andrews           Age    11
  • Andrew Andrews       Age    9
  • Robert Andrews          Age    7
  • John Burke                   Age    10
  • William Burke             Age    7
  • Arnold Barter              Age    14
  • Arnold Bouthellette     Age    6
  • Donald Cameron         Age    12
  • Henry Cameron           Age    13
  • Leo Coffee                  Age    10
  • William Coffee            Age    10
  • Francis Depalma         Age    8
  • Chester Doyle             Age    8
  • Edward Doyle             Age    14
  • Roger Duby                Age    13
  • Arthur Duby               Age    12
  • Ernest Dumas              Age    13
  • Leslie Dumas              Age    12
  • Francis Dumas            Age    7
  • John Donahue             Age    9
  • Ernest Donahue           Age    10
  • Walter Donahue          Age    6
  • Loin Ducette                Age    8
  • Herbert Flynn              Age    13
  • Bernard Flynn             Age    12
  • Albert Gallant              Age    11
  • Albert Garneau            Age    13
  • Gerald Hannigan         Age    5
  • Patrick Lahey              Age    12
  • Frederick Lahey          Age    9
  • Timothy Lahey            Age    6
  • Lucian Ladrette            Age    8
  • Ferrand Lanrivand       Age    12
  • Raymond Laimey        Age    10
  • Francis Legasse           Age    7
  • Michael Marotte          Age    7
  • Edward Mcgahey        Age    10
  • Linwood Mcgahey      Age    9
  • Raymond Melanson    Age    8
  • Norman Mcleod          Age    10
  • Charles Mcleod           Age    13
  • Lawrence Mitchell       Age    12
  • Robert Mclaughlin      Age    7
  • Raymond Mclaughlin  Age    6
  • Edward Noonan          Age    10
  • Norbert Nedeau           Age    9
  • Howard Miner            Age    7
  • Robert O’Brien            Age    8
  • Everett Russel             Age    6
  • Rennie Thereanld        Age    10
  • John Thompson          Age    8
  • Richard Towle             Age    10
  • William Towle             Age    10
  • Nelson Veiga              Age    10
  • David Barlett               Age    5

In 1935, at the request of Bishop Joseph McCarthy, the St Louis Home and School was sold by the Roman Catholic Bishop of Portland to the Sisters of Charity (Grey Nuns) of Lewiston.

During the ten years between 1930 and 1940, the staff went from 3 to 17 and the number of boys went from 55 to 68 in 1940. Although it was now owned by the Sisters of Charity there was a Catholic Priest there who led the Chaplain work.  There were twelve reverend sisters who cared for the children. The sisters ranged from 56-year old Mother-Superior Tanerede, to the youngest sister, 23-year-old Sister Carignon. It is interesting to note that the priest was from Maine, but none of the sisters were.  Nine of the sisters were from French Canada and three were from New Hampshire.

Four other adults (all women) also lived at the home.  The oldest was Miss Aime Levesque, age 78 who worked for her board. There was one retired woman, Mrs. Ina Perrin, and there were two women who lived there and worked in the kitchen.

The 1940 census indicates there were 68 children living there. The oldest of the boys was 12-year-old Camille Paulin; the youngest was Donald Briseboos. All the children were born in Maine except for Two born in Italy (Matthew and Michael Troiano), two born in Vermont (Robert and Antonio Valeriani), one born in Massachusetts, and one born in Pennsylvania. The children were:

  • Camille Paulin                        12
  • Paul Rowe                              12
  • James Mastro                         12
  • John Ross                              11
  • Charles Wardwell                   11
  • Matthew Troiano                    11
  • Henri Champagne                  11
  • Gerard Grenier                       11
  • Valmore Berube                     11
  • Bertrand Pepin                       11
  • Louis Levasseur                     10
  • Norman Ovellette                   10
  • Normand Lagueux                 10
  • Francis Brennan                     10
  • David Plutt                             10
  • Robert Valeriani                     10
  • Robert Champagne                 10
  • Normand Pinette                    9
  • Robert Conley                        9
  • Leo Marston                           9
  • Montfort Duellette                  9
  • Arthur Wardwell                    9
  • Antonio Valeriani                   9
  • Louis Baudone                       9
  • Russell Heath                         9
  • Romeo Comeau                      9
  • Rene Paradis                          9
  • William Hellbergh                  9
  • Resinald Adam                       9
  • Philip Roy                              8
  • Joseph Jieaney                       8
  • Robert Wheeler                      8
  • Robert Methot                        8
  • Raymund Duellette                 8
  • Emery Berube                        8
  • William Thibodeau                 8
  • Thomas Carey                        7
  • Francis Troiano                      7
  • Osila Plutt                              7
  • Arthur Poulin                         7
  • Raymond Hubert                    7
  • Maurice Thibodeau                7
  • Leonard Cassiday                   7
  • David Laplante                       7
  • Walter Powers                        7
  • William Morin                        7
  • Vincent Lapomardo                6
  • John Lewis Foley                   6
  • Anthony Henry                      6
  • Roger Poolin                          6
  • Maurice Methot                      6
  • Albert Beaudoin                     6
  • Richard Loveitt                       6
  • James Shaw                           6
  • William Mains                        6
  • Michael Troiano                     5
  • Richard Tierney                      5
  • Lewis Augustus Heath           5
  • Robert Fletcher                       5
  • James Hannewell                   5
  • Roger Peyin                           5
  • Norman Shaw                        5
  • David Mains                          5
  • Raymond Desrosiers              4
  • Richard Farnham                    3
  • Donald Brisebors                   3
  • Wayne Mains                         3

Image of The Wayland Christmas Ornament.The Sisters of Mercy began to accept girls as well as boys and the facility changed its name to the Saint Louis Home for Boys and Girls.

In 1971 the Sisters shifted their services to childcare and shortly after the facility became a part of Catholic Charities Maine[iv].

The Sisters of Charity (Grey Nuns) of Lewiston eventually sold the land and buildings to another organization called “The Bible Speaks” who provided the headquarters for a radio evangelist.[v] They in turn had to sell the property when they were involved in a multi-million-dollar lawsuit.[vi]

Today, the building it is “Dunstan Corner” A shopping and office complex. It includes businesses such as:

  • Dunstan Corner Today - Photo by Don Taylor

    Dunstan Corner Today

    Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

  • Eric Krantz, LCSW – Children, Individual, Marriage & Family Counseling Services
  • Gail Ann Fabric – Bosal Foam
  • Jack Burke, LMFT – Marriage & Family Therapy
  • Jackson Hewitt – Tax Service
  • Mary Menard, L.A.D.C – A Satellite of Recovery Associates, Inc.
  • MEND – Health & Wellness of Maine
  • Nail Pro
  • Progress Sharing Company – Personal, Business, Live, Health & Group Plans
  • Scarborough Hollow Clock Works – Clock Repair
  • The Abby – Catholic Books, Gifts, Cards, Music
  • VitaminSea – Maine Sea Vegetables
  • We’re Styling – Family Salon

Now I know, the Dunstan Corner building was once a restaurant, The Wayland, then became a Catholic Home for Boys, later a Home and School for Boys and Girls, the headquarters for “Bible Speaks.” Since its reconstruction in 1912, it had many additions that has made it the multi-purpose building it is today.


ENDNOTES

[ii]  Maine Memory Network | Wayland House, Scarborough, ca. 1912 Accessed 10/2/2017 – https://www.mainememory.net/artifact/29400.

[iii] “United States Census, 1930,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XM85-J9W : accessed 21 November 2017), The household of Sister Genevieve Hayes, Scarborough, Cumberland, , United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 89, sheet 7A, line 4, family 127, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 831; FHL microfilm 2,340,566.

[iv] Internet: Catholic Charities – /about/history – “History of Catholic Charities Maine” https://www.ccmaine.org/about/history Accessed 10/2/2017.

[v] Scarborough Leader July 23,1999 – Page 18.

[vi] “The Current” February 6, 2003

[vii] Scarborough Leader July 16, 1999 Page 15

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Bible of Thomas and Margaret Dearing (dated 1847)

Bible of Thomas and Margaret Dearing
(dated 1847)

Transcribed by: Eloise LeFevre Graham Brooks
October 24, 2005

[Webmaster Note: This Bible mentions “Henry C. Leary of Scrobro, Maine” (Scarboro) and individuals from Saco, Portland, and Old Orchard.  Parts of this transcription were reformatted for this media (page returns, etc., however, the original transcription were left as is. The complete original translation is available as a PDF at the end of this posting.]

Dearing Bible Inside Page

Inside page (Not Transcribed

Dearing Bible - Title Page

Title Page

Family Record

Marriages

Dearing Bible - Marriages

Marriages

Thomas Dearing Jr., Saco, Me. &
Margaret C. Aumock, Millstone, N.J.
Married, March 9th, 1844
By C. F. Worrell

William C. Aumock of New Jersey
to Anna L. Hains of Maine
Married in Saco June 18, 1848
By Rev N.M. Williams

Leander G Brunel &
Louisa N Dearing
Married June 19, 1878
By Rev T D Anderson
All of Portland Maine

Henry C. Leary of Scrobro Maine &
Rosse Emma Dearing of Portland Maine
Married June 15, 1892
By Rev W Ayers

Family Record

Births (Page 1 of 2)

Image of Births page 1 of 2

Births (p. 1 of 2)

Charles T. Dearing
Born 30th June, 1845

Louisa Nancy Dearing
Born 22d January 1854.

Rossie. Emma. Dearing
Born 30th March

Louisa children 1861

Thomas Alphonso Brunel
Born Feb 12, 1882

Richard Brunel
Born January 23, 1887

Leander G. Brunel
Born January 20, 1850.

 

Family Record

Births (Page 2 of 2)

Dearing Bible Image 5, Births page 2 of 2

Births (Page 2 of 2)

Thomas Dearing Jr.
Born October 8th, 1819

Thomas Dearing, Jr., was son of Thomas and Nancy Dearing of Old Orchard, Me. (See under Deaths – Bible of John and Nancy Aumock R. Brunel 9/30/29

——

Margaret C. Aumock
Born Sept. 27th, 1823

Family Record

Deaths

Image of Dearing Bible - Deaths

Dearing Bible – Deaths

Charles T. Dearing,
Died December 17th, 1846
Aged 17 months & 17 days.

Thomas Dearing Jr
Died September 9th, 1891
Aged 71 years, eleven months & 1 day

Rossie Emma Dearing Leary
Daughter of Thomas & Margaret Dearing
Wife of Henry Leary Moths
Aged 33:8.9 day
Dec. 8, 1894

Margaret (Aumock) Dearing
Aug, 1903

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Tunis Dearing
Born June 30, 1815
Died December 17, 1846

Marriage Certificate

Image of Marriage Certificat for Thomas Dearing, Jr. and Margaret C, Aumock.

Marriage Certificate

This is to CERTIFY all whom it may Concern,

That Mr. Thomas Dearing Jr of Saco Maine and Miss Margaret C. Aumock of New Jersey appeared before me, And no lawful hindrance appearing were solemnly united in Holy Wedlock, This Ninth day of March in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and forty-four and pronounced
Man and Wife by ME.

C. F. Worrell

Transcriber’s note: on the left edge of the Marriage Certificate is printed (perpendicular to the above text):

Marriage Certificate
Printed in the Monmouth Enquirer Office, Freehold.

Freehold is in Monmouth County, N.J.


The Spring Street Baptist Church (Dearing Bible, 1847)
The Spring Street Baptist Church

Origines 1860 Rev Mr Butler, Pastor

The Spring Street Baptist Church 1860 (Page 1 of 2)

Rev Mr Buller & Wife
Decon Bangs & Wife
Decon Smuith & Wife
Cleark Mr Kimbe & wife
Mr F Jorden & wife
Mr We Jorden & wife
Mrs Margaret Jorden
Miss Margret Jorden
Miss Ellen Jorden
Mr. Hiram Farbanks & wife
Mr Elbdrige Coffen & wife
Miss Norton
Miss Abbe Coffen
Charles Coffen
Miss Suse Coffen
Mr Gould & wife
Miss Ameail Gould
MrAbrem Libbe & wife
Mr Hicks & wife
MrSotory & wife
MrHogkins & wife
Mr Thomas Dearing & wife
MrFrnk Bartlet & wife
Mr Record & wife
Mr Deater & wife

(end of page 1 of 2)

Spring Church continues

Spring Church members

Mrs Chamberlin
Mrs McKenney
Miss Ruth McKenney
Mrs Stockpole
Mrs Dingley
Mr Donald Wiggan & wife
Mr Harlan Wiggan & wife
Miss Emma Libbe
Miss Rossie Phillpes
Miss Emma Kimble
Mr Ablion Jorden & wife
Mrs Burel
Mrs Sterson
Miss Estel Chase
Mr Phelep Bridges
Miss Nancy Bridges
Miss Sarah Bridges
Mrs Howard
Mr Hines & wife
Mrs Wiggon

(end of page 2 of 2)

Letter from Margaret C. Dearing, dated

Portland, May 11, 1890 (3 pages) (Dearing Bible, 1847)

O. What a happy return of the the Sabbath to look back over the past 49 years of my life for in tho[-] se year have been meny changes in my life but in them all I have never regreted the setep I then took for I put on christ by being baptized

New York
May the 9 1841 in Macdugale St church by
the Rev Mr Duncan Dunbar O happy
I was and christ has been ever dear to me ever cince in 1844 I came to Main to live in 1845 I lost a Dear Brother in 1846 I lost my Dear Boy the pet of Father and my self, I felt that my Heavly Father know wat was best for me my Pastor thought I had best send for my letter I joined the church in saco then we left & whent to Camden Maine and fro[-] m to Damariscotta and from thar to Auburn Maine my heart was made glade or to re rejoice for my Husband received Christ as his

(end of page 1 of 3)

first Sunday in April.

Savour 1858 he was Baptized, By Rev Mr Knox we joined the Lewistown Church and when the Auburn Church was formed we came of with the rest about 60 in number in April 1860 and we lived thare till May 1872 the we came to Portland and we joined the first Bastist
Church and I have allways felt that I had a friend that stick closer than a Brother in all my Sorrows wich has been meny for I have losst dear freands Father Mother Brothers & Sisters I feal thay have gan home and I hope to see them when my Debt is payed but how long my Debt may run I can tell but I hope to be ready to pay it when it come du

Margaret C Dearing
(end of page 2 of 3)

this is for Thomas A. Brunel

in the summer if 1869 Louisa N Dearing was Baptized in the spring of 1888 Rossie Emma Dearing was Baptize by Rev Dr Small Pastor of the firs Baptist Church Portland Louisa was Baptized by the Rev Dr G P Mathews of Auburn

Thomas Dearing

My Dear Husband died 9th of Sept 1891 another one of my Dear ones has gon befor me to the happy land whare I hope to go as soon as my work is don hear on eart MCD

(end of page 3 of 3)

Images of Dearing Family Bible History Pages in PDF format – 5.4 MB Download.
Transcript of Dearing Family Bible History Pages in PDF format – 98Kb Download.

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