70.14.17 A1 – Letter – McLaughlin to McLaughlin

70.14.17 A1 – Letter – Almira McLaughlin to her nephew (W.H. McLaughlin), 29 July 1898

[I recently received a package “Tilton Papers” which contains letters, family notes and other materials regarding the Tilton family in Scarborough. The material was originally received in 1970. Many of the items were later transcribed and typed. I have digitized the original letters. I have also included a copy of each of the pages here. I then scanned the typed transcription and OCRed it for search capabilities.

This is the first item, 70.14.17 A1 in the collection. 

It is a letter from Almira McLaughlin to W. H. McLaughlin, dated July 29, 1898. After OCRing the transcript, I performed a very light editing to improve readability. Names included in this letter include:

    • Burnham, Aaron (Mrs.)
    • Chadwick (Mr. & Mrs.)
    • Collins, (Mrs.)
    • Cumston, (Col.)
    • Lancaster, (Mr.)
    • Lancaster, (Parson)
    • McLaughlin, Almira
    • McLaughlin, Robert
    • McLaughlin, W. H.
    • Moulton, Danied
    • Sawyer, (Mr.)
    • Storer, Henry G.
    • Tilton, (Mrs.)]

Transcription of a letter to W.H. McLaughlin from Almira McLauglin – July 29, 1898.

Castine, Me.


July 29, 1898.

My Dear Nephew:

Your recent letter and copy of the “Argus” were promptly received – please accept my thanks for the courtesy.

I was quite interested in the reports of the festivities of the “Glorious Fourth” with you, was glad Scarboro could join in the universal expression of patriotism of the “Union” on this memorable year. I think it has not been her wont to freely utter all the choicest promptings of the Higher nature.

But one must be dull indeed to resist the powerful influence that fills our very atmosphere in every niche – developing such noble specimens of the possibilities of Humanity and thus ameliorating the bitter ills that still stalk beside its pathway.

I would gladly respond to your request for information relative to the Ecclesiastical history of Scarboro were I possession of any facts that would aid you in the least.

Very little of my life was spent in my native town and my associations with the Black Point Parish were extremely limited as you will perceive by the assurance that I never saw either the “Old Meeting House” or the more modern church; and my high estimation of the worshippers therein was imbibed from their just appreciation by the older members of my family.

Parson Lancaster I have many times heard preach in the 2nd Parish Pulpit. The old custom of “exchanges” was continued until the close of his public service, though his theologic views differed widely from his neighboring brothers. I recall him as a tall hard – featured person, whose meritorious traits were sadly obscured by a stern and selfish nature. He 1 has been so long a resident of that Land where happier views attain, we will trust he long ago attuned his harp to sweeter strains of melody. And are we not told to tread lightly o’er the ashes of the departed?

I do not know the site of the “Old Meeting House” at Dunstan. When the later house was to be built, there was much discussion about the location, persons in the western part of the town thought a more central point was due to the many residents in that section.

Finally it was decided to yield one mile of the distance from Dunstan Corner, a Mrs Collins, deeding a large lot of land from an orchard for the building, so long as it should be used for ” religious purposes”. The house was very large and substantially built, fronting north with large well proportioned “Porch” as then styled, entered by three doors, two flights of stairs therein led to the galleries, in which were two rows of pews on the sides, and the front contained the “singers seats” from which sometimes came very good music but not always. The pulpit was at the rear, accessible “sounding board” overhead, which was a source of terror to me lest it fall. Seats for the Deacons were just in front of the pulpit, raised a little from the floor as were all the wall pews.

There were three aisles, the center one was entered from the Porch, the two side ones from doors in the main building. The pews were all square with hinged seats which oft times came down audibly. The house was well lighted by its two windows in two tiers of forty panes on each side and eight more at the ends. But there was not a sign of any heating apparatus within its walls save the old time tin footstove or a warmed foot- plank which after a 5 or 6 mile drive was rewarmed or refilled at the pastor’s fire. That was at a later date at opposite side of the way and was expected to be ready for service at “early meeting hour”. Truly the people ff those days had good courage and power of endurance. During the winter there was usually but one service, and for a number of years, that was held in the Pastor’s house. I have no reference at time of Father’s final resignation; a year or two afterward a Mr. Sawyer was induced to make an effort to rebuild the society by the Maine Missionary Agency, but less than a year after his ordination he retired, utterly discouraged. The fine old building, with no one to care for it went rapidly to decay – A “resting place for the bats and owl” – till finally leave was granted by the Legislature for its sale at auction, the proceeds of which, were barely enough to pay for its razing and refenceing the lot to previous condition.

The large Pulpit Bible presented at the time of the Dedication by Mrs. Aaron Burnham (one of the staunchest members of the Parish) was transferred to the “Union or Free” House at the west part of the town not far from Buxton.

Mrs. Burnhams home was in that vicinity in those early times. Have I omitted anything connected with this subject? Can you not find your way into the middle aisle and seat yourself in your grandfather’s (Robert Mc Laughlin’s) pew? -about the fifth from the entrance.

The next one was Col. Cumston’s, both of which were usually well filled. How many venerable white – haired couples I can recall as assembled there and all of whom joined the great majority. I am the last surviving member of the church, it may be of the parish also. One of the Deacons ( Danied Moulton) survived the Pastor a few years and was at his funeral services in 1852 joining his hemulous voice in the cheerful, trustful hymns that were there rendered. He Had always been prominent in the choir. Mr. Henry G. Storer, whose presence was ever a benediction, led the services on that occasion, as also just eight weeks previously, at the gathering of the same little circle of friends at the funeral of my mother.

It comes before me at this moment as the last reunion of both family and church on this side of Life’s River and one more crossing will complete the circle of the opposite bank where all will probably better understand their individual responsibilities and have more charity for the failings of others. If a little more of that spirit were manifested while here the happiness of the world at large would be greatly advanced.

There was a pastor at Dunstan previous to 1800, Rev. Mr. Chadwick,

I do not know the length of his charge. His resignation was caused by ill health, mental and physical. He continued to reside at Dunstan a number of years. I recall the gloominess of his funeral. Children of tender age were expected to participate on those occasions. Parson Lancaster officiated, being the elder clerique.

Mrs. Chadwick a delicate sensitive woman was very ill and the three daughters were also quite worn with long watchings. Under the circumstances, Mr. T. suggested that Mr. Lancaster present as cheerful aspedt as possible. The result was the whole of that most higubrious hymn that Isaac Watts ever wrote – a lengthy sermon and prayer in harmony therewith. Perhaps you have met with the hymn alleded to – “Hark from the tombs a doleful sound, mine ears attend the cry – ye living men come view the ground, where you must shortly lie” etc. Probably the venerable pastor would not think a burial perfected that did not send forth that warning note. It is a blessing to have outlived those dark, dismal views.

I have “looked backward: a long way and offer you, perhaps in too many words, the thoughts I have collected by the wayside of my memory. They are for your special edification. There may not be an iota of any value for the purpose you wished, but if there is an occasion to use a crumb, you can do so on the strict proviso that neither by name or inference I am to be connected with it.

It was a lonesome route to travel alone and have wished for some one who had been over the ground with whom to discuss salient points and brighten the picture. But you must accept it with its imperfections. I think I prefer to look forward in anticipation of future joys and reunion with friends, rather than traversing those forsaken fields.

I note the incident you refer to in your address, and I think had we heard the remark of Mrs. Tilton, from herself, at the time, the phraseology would have been a little different from what has come to us 80 or more years later. Sharp sayings lose none of their acidity by travel.

To return to the Meeting house, I would add it was painted white, with roof, doors and steps a deep reddish brown. The inside was of the native wood guiltless of paint except on the pulpit the table and seats in front of it which were painted white.

Accept my best wishes for your health and success in business affairs. Aim to make the world better for your having passed through it. Kind regards to your family also.

From your Aunt Almira McLaughlin


[The 10 images are available for download in a ZIP file or click on each image to see and download images individually.]

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Bicentennial Quilt Exhibit & Reception – August 22nd.

Banner: Celebrating - Maine's Bicentennial - 200

March 15, 2020 marked the 200th anniversary of Maine’s Statehood. The Scarborough Public Library and Scarborough Historical Society began to bring a series of programs to our community in celebration of this bicentennial benchmark in early March. The series was made possible through the financial partnership of the Scarborough Public Library and Scarborough Historical Society, and through a grant awarded by the Maine Humanities Council; all events are free to attend. The first program was held at the Library prior to the pandemic. Dr. Liam Riordan, Adelaide and Alan Bird Professor of History at the University of Maine, delivered his talk Past and Present Perspectives in Maine Statehood on the afternoon of March 1, 2020 in the Library’s Meeting Room. Click here to view the recording.

Please call 883-4723 option 4 or email askSPL@scarboroughlibrary.org(link sends e-mail) with questions about the up-coming rescheduled events in the series.

Upcoming Event

Bicentennial Quilt Exhibit & Reception

Sunday, August 22, 2021 – 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Images from the Scarborough Bicentennial QuiltThe Scarborough Bicentennial Series will feature an exhibit of the Scarborough Bicentennial Quilt. In the fall of 2019, nearly 50 quilters from our community created individual squares representing themes related to our town and its history. The assembled quilt will be displayed at the Library during the week of August 22, 2021 on a bed owned by William King, Scarborough native and Maine’s first Governor. The bed is part of the Scarborough Historical Society’s collection. The exhibit will be open during regular library hours and will acknowledge the talented quilters who shared their time and creativity to make this commemorative quilt possible! 

Please join us to honor and celebrate the quilters at a reception at the Library on Sunday afternoon, August 22, from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

This series was made possible through the financial partnership of the Scarborough Public Library and  Scarborough Historical Society, and through a grant awarded by the Maine Humanities Council. This is the first Bicentennial program to be held at the Library since the pandemic. It is free to attend.

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Museum has Resumed Normal Hours and Operations

The Scarborough Historical Society Museum has resumed normal hours and operations. Reservations are no longer required.

Out of an abundance of caution, visitors are required to wear masks while visiting to protect other visitors and volunteers.


Please see Maine’s Museum COVID19 Prevention Checklist Industry Guidance for further information on Museum COVID protocols. Also, see Google’s Covid-19 Alert for Maine for the latest status of Coronavirus disease in Maine.


 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Updated Scarborough Annual Reports

Under the Scarborough Annual Reports, I added the 1956 Annual Report.

In 1956, the Town of Scarborough began separating the “Warrant for the Town Meeting” from being a part of the Annual Report to being a separate publication.
The “Warrant for the Town Meeting of the Town of Scarborough, Monday, March 5, 1956.” is now available at Digital Maine and Archive.Org.

I have also added the 1957 and 1958 Scarborough Town Reports.

1957  Report
(February 1, 1958)
Digital Maine
Archive.Org

1958 Report
(January 31, 1959)
Digital Maine
Internet Archives


 

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SEDCO produced videos of how COVID affected several Scarborough businesses

SEDCO – Scarborough Economic Development Corporation produced an excellent series of videos regarding how Covid affected five Scarborough businesses. Represented are:

For more information on this project and “The Road to Recovery 2020 & Beyond,” please see the SEDCOMAINE.COM website.

 
Posted in Businesses, Videos | Leave a comment

Museum Open by Appointment Only

The Scarborough Historical Society Museum is open to a limited number of visitors by appointment only. Visitors may schedule appointments for Tuesdays and the second Saturday of the month from 9:00 AM to Noon. Appointments are 50 minutes. 

9:10 to 10:00
10:05 to 10:55
11::00 to 11:50

Please indicate if your visit is for to see the Museum displays or for Research time. 

Volunteers will wear masks while visitors are in the building. Visitors must wear masks while visiting to protect other visitors and volunteers.

Also, we will be collecting data from visitors to assist with contact tracing should staff or visitors test positive for COVID-19.

If anyone (visitors or volunteers) tests positive for the disease, the museum will close until the situation is resolved. The Society Board of Directors will continue to monitor government and public health authorities’ updates for guidance on public safety measures and will adapt measures accordingly.

Please email scarboroughhist@gmail.com to schedule an appointment. Alternately, you may schedule a visit by phone (207-885-9997) at least 1 week in advance. 


Please see Maine’s Museum COVID19 Prevention Checklist Industry Guidance for further information on Museum COVID protocols. Also, see Google’s Covid-19 Alert for Maine for the latest status of Coronavirus disease in Maine.


 

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Letter from Dorothy Evens to Helen Lamb postmarked Aug 31, 1939.

[This is a letter from “Dotty” (at the Atlantic House and Cottages, Scarborough Beach, Maine,) to “Grammy” (Miss Helen Lamb, Gorham Maine R.F.D. #2. The letter was postmarked Aug 31, 1939, Scarborough, Maine at 3 PM.]

Transcription

Hi! “Grammy”,
How’s everything in Whiterock?  I’ll bet they don’t even miss me!  Are you getting so much practice in croquet that you’ll beat me all to pieces when I get back?
Gee it’s swell down here– everyone is so grand to me.  There are very few restrictions here — we can play tennis on the courts, use the shuffle board, go swimming on the same beach with the guests can an’ everything.  We stay in a house by ourselves and go to bed when we want to, only we have to get up at 5:30.  Imagine that!
Some of the youngsters I have are very exasperating but some of them are dolls.  I have quite a lot of time off, but I don’t know where it goes to. Honestly it seems as though I had been here ten minutes.
I think I will have mama Sunday night and i want them to bring you with ’em.  I’ll tell Helen to call you.
I’m getting along famously with my work.  I still write the orders just to be sure I get everything.  The nurses are awful good (every child has a nurse or governess) and I  have a lot of fun with them.
Two of the girls weren’t speaking to me because I glanced at their boy friends.  You should see them — dumb as they make them. A new waitress is just about it so they used to come into my dining room after every meal while I was sweeping. When I found out about the girl friends I stopped that.  Now the girls smile.  I think they are terribly silly — boy if I did that every time a girl looked at Phil I couldn’t keep them straight and I might speak to the wrong person.  There are about  three radios going here all different so I’ll stop before it gets so  you can’t make sense out of this thing. Write. Love, Dotty

The address is just what is at the top of the papers.
Have about six more letters to write.  Got a letter from Phil this morning. His letters are swell, just as though he were here talking to me. I don’t see how he makes them so interesting.

[Transcription by Rebecca (Plummer) Delaware – 4/11/2021]

Additional Notes:

  • “Grammy” is Helen Lamb, later Plummer.
  • “Dotty” is believed to be Dorothy Evens. Apparently a waitress for the Atlantic House in Scarborough in 1939.
  • “Helen” mentioned in the letter is probably Dotty’s sister, Helen Evans.
  • “Phil” mentioned is probably Philip Bodge.
  • Helen Lamb, Dorothy Evans, and Philip Bodge graduated from Gorham High School as part of the class of 1940. The Evans and Lambs were from Whiterock (a part of Gorham) which is mostly a rural farming community. Philip Bodge lived in Gorham village.
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Letter dated 28 Feb 1870 re “Strip” between Scarboro & Gorham

Portland Feb. 28 1870          

Dear Jim,

Letter re. Strip Between Scarboro and Gorham – 28 Feb 1870 – Page 1

            With regard to the claim of the “strip” I am aware that there was some provision in the act setting off a part of the Town of Scarboro to Gorham that provided for returning to the “strip” a part of the same that might be reimbursed to Scarboro by the State. But what part?

            If in proposition to the valuation that was transfered by the same act from Scarboro to Gorham there would be nothing to pay, as no valuation was transferred to Gorham. Scarboro paid State & Property(?) Tax for the town of Gorham on the value of the strip 3 successive years. Finally when is was arranged by the Legislature the valuation was fixed by a meeting of the selectmen of Gorham & Scarboro and I think they made it about $36,000 and this was all the selectmen of Gorham would agree to.

            Again the war had not ended when the “strip” was set off and it was only the amount

[New Page ]

Letter re. Strip Between Scarboro and Gorham – 28 Feb 1870 – Page 2

reimbursed to the town on the men enlisted previous to, or up to the time that they were set off in which the strip could have any claim.

            And again Scarboro was one of the sub districts of this District and was just the same after the strip was set off to Gorham as before. An effort was made to have the men liable to draft transfered from Scarboro to Gorham but it could not be accomplished and our quota was made larger because the “strip” was enrolled with us and we furnished the quota for the strip and paid the expense after it was set off to Gorham but of course could not tax them for this expense.

            I am surprised that under these circumstances they have made any claim at all; and still more that any action should be taken on it by the Legislature without notice to the Town of Scarboro.

            There ought to be power somewhere to do justice in this case if anywhere in the Legislature. They without doubt mean justice but how can they do justice unless they hear both sides. Scarboro has not been notified in any way I am informed.

In haste,          
Horatio Hight


[Transcription by Maggie Vickerson, Scarborough Historical Society, 8 May 2020]
[Encapsulated Collection 23 – Letter re Strip Between Scarboro and Gorham – 28 Feb 1870]

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Museum Open by Appointment

The Scarborough Historical Society Museum is open to a limited number of visitors by appointment only. Visitors may schedule appointments for Tuesdays and the second Saturday of the month from 9:00 AM to Noon. Appointments are 50 minutes. 

9:10 to 10:00
10:05 to 10:55
11::00 to 11:50

Please indicate if your visit is for to see the Museum displays or for Research time. 

Volunteers will wear masks while visitors are in the building. Visitors must wear masks while visiting to protect other visitors and volunteers.

Also, we will be collecting data from visitors to assist with contact tracing should staff or visitors test positive for COVID-19.

If anyone (visitors or volunteers) tests positive for the disease, the museum will close until the situation is resolved. The Society Board of Directors will continue to monitor government and public health authorities’ updates for guidance on public safety measures and will adapt measures accordingly. .

Please email scarboroughhist@gmail.com to schedule an appointment. Alternately, you may schedule a visit by phone (207-885-9997) at least 1 week in advance. 


Please see Maine’s Museum COVID19 Prevention Checklist Industry Guidance for further information on Museum COVID protocols. Also, see Google’s Covid-19 Alert for Maine for the latest status of Coronavirus disease in Maine.


 

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New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham [1865]

[Page 1]

New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham – 1865 (Page 1)

Agreeable to notice given by the Selectmen of the town of Scarborough to the Selectmen of the town of Gorham to meet at the House of John M. Parker in said Gorham on the 19th day of June 1865 at 9 o’clock in the forenoon for the purpose of establishing a new line between the said towns of Scarboro and Gorham in accordance with an act of the Legislature Approved March 4th 1864 setting off a part of the lower of Scarborough and annexing the same to the town of Gorham. We the undersigned Selectmen of the Towns of Scarborough and Gorham met at the time and place and for the purpose aforesaid and proceeded to name(?) and establish a new line between said towns as follows

[Page 2]

New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham – 1865 (Page 2)

Commencing at a stone on the side line of Buxton, north corner of Scarboro’ and southwest corner of Gorham – thence running S. 42 ½ ° East 178 Rods to a stone on the Buxton County road. Thence on same course 240 Rods to a stone on the Burnham Road thence on same course 209 Rods to a stone on Ai Waterhouse meadow. Thence S. 49° West to a stone 21 Rods 10 links, thence S. 44 ½° East 29 Rods 17 links to a stone in the east corner of Jonathan(?) Fogg’s meadow, and south corner of Ai Waterhouse’s meadow. Thence N. 50° East 20 Rods to a stone sitting in the South side of said meadow N. 53° East 186 Rods to the Mitchell Road to a stone. Thence north 48 ¾° East 972 Rods to a stone at the corner of Scarborough, Westbrook, and Gorham

Scarborough July 3d 1865

Richard Leavitt } Selectmen of
   Geo M. Carter } Scarborough

   James Phinney } Selectmen of
Edward Files } Gorham

[-back-]

New Town line
between Scarboro
and Gorham


[Transcription by Maggie Vickerson, Scarborough Historical Society, 8 May 2020]
[Ref: Encapsulated Collection 22 – New Town Line Between Scarboro and Gorham – 1865]

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